What are the Problems Associated with Using Supply Drones

What are the Problems Associated with Using Supply Drones

Rumors are circulating that the FAA in the US is currently working to pass new legislation to enable drones to be tested, but everyone will have to wait and see if this occurs globally.

Fremont, CA: Over the last decade, there have been several changes in global supply chains. Companies can now track how orders are made, stock levels, and the condition of global supply chains thanks to the use of data. Transportation has become more affordable as a result of improved technology, as well as numerous safety advancements.

While we speak of these significant steps forward, the fact is that supply chain progress has been limited to minor tweaks to current processes or minor changes to technology.

This is why Amazon, the world's biggest online retailer, jumped in with drones. Drones were designed with the premise that small parcels can be transported by unmanned flying vehicles, allowing for 30-minute delivery. Dominos and Google are both experimenting with various types of drones for distribution.

Let us look at some hurdles:

Extensive Approval from Aviation Authorities

The most difficult obstacle that retailers planning to use this technology have encountered is that the use of airborne distribution systems necessitates extensive approval not only from boards and engineers but also from international aviation authorities. Any aircraft in the world must have a flight plan and undergo safety checks before leaving the runway; how does this work for unmanned drones?

Rumors are circulating that the FAA in the US is currently working to pass new legislation to enable drones to be tested, but everyone will have to wait and see if this occurs globally.

Insurance and Costs

With potentially thousands of dollars in goods and tens of thousands of dollars in drones flying unmanned hundreds of feet above the ground, insurance would be a must. The challenge would be determining how insurance providers will insure something that has yet to be checked. A drone's possible harm may be in the millions of dollars.

This means that insurance rates will most likely be high at first and that these higher costs will most likely be passed on to consumers, making deliveries more costly and slower to spread as a mainstream practice.

Check This Out: Top Supply Chain Solution Companies

Weekly Brief